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BAAPS statement on Brazilian Buttock Lifts

London – 29 August 2018 - The British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (http://baaps.org.uk) today issue a statement on Brazilian Buttock Lift (BBL) surgery in the wake of the tragic news of a British woman’s death after undergoing the procedure abroad. 

The Association cannot comment on individual cases, however in light of the increasing popularity and interest in the treatment, we must reiterate our previous warnings about the danger of surgery abroad; and raise awareness to the potential for serious complications relating to BBL surgery – the risks of which are minimised, if at all mentioned, by many offering it.

According to Consultant Plastic Surgeon and BAAPS Member Bryan Mayou; 

"The surgery technique known as Brazilian Butt Lift, or BBL, is the process of recontouring the lower back and loins with liposuction, reinjecting the unwanted fat to augment the upper buttocks in order to create a pert lifted effect.

If fat is injected deep into muscle tissue and lower down on the buttocks, there is a risk of incorrectly injecting fat into large veins. The fat, now an embolus, can pass around the bloodstream, into the lungs and cause death.

Fat grafting is an established technique carried out by surgeons across the globe for number of reconstructive and aesthetic problems. However, many of those offering the procedure, particularly for BBL, are without training in these techniques. BBL's popularity is often promoted by celebrities via unmonitored social media marketing, targeting young and vulnerable people.

Plastic Surgeons from international societies have set up a task force to monitor and report on the situation. Their startling report shows that there is a mortality of 1 in 3000 following BBL. In addition and most importantly, all deaths investigated were due to fat emboli and in each case fat was found in the buttock muscle. 

Surgeons carrying out this procedure must have proper knowledge of anatomy and training in fat grafting techniques, and it is imperative that they are properly-qualified plastic surgeons, who perform the surgery in an appropriate hospital setting. Patients should avoid anyone offering the surgery outside a clinical setting, and remember that BAAPS is firmly against cosmetic surgery tourism, which purports to offer discount prices when patients travel abroad. The standard of care is not equivalent in every country, and by making the decision to undergo cut-price surgery, patients risk serious complications and even - as this tragic story illustrates - death.”

 

ENDS

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